"A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything." - Friedrick Nietzsche

Atheist, scientist, secular Buddhist, rat lover, etc.

Originally from Iowa,I am a biology graduate student at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

My boyfriend is playing some political game where you can pick any country you want and invade places  and do whatever.  He’s Palestine right now and he’s trying to make it into a utopia.  It makes me really, really sad actually.  It just makes me think about all of the lovely, kind Palestinians that I met while I was over there a few years ago.  

Also, wearing my Palestinian keffiyah in support of the people all this week.  Not that that does a whole lot in the long run, besides maybe if people ask about it I can educate them about the current and ongoing situation.  

You can order a keffiya from Herbawi Textile Factory, the last remaining Palestinian factory making them in Hebron here: http://palestineonlinestore.com/shop/kufiyeh-from-palestine/  

Wow, Israel. It is like you are trying to sink as low as humanly possible.  Also, Obama,  way to show off why you have a Nobel Peace Prize by supporting this shit.  You are the lesser of two evils but not by a whole hell of a lot. Absolutely disgusting.

Reblogged from nathanhmoore  32 notes
nathanhmoore:

Tears of Gaza director: “How could one not want to show the world what is happening?”
By Joanne Laurier 28 September 2010
Originally reported on the World Socialist Web Site
The Israeli military’s murderous assault in December 2008-January 2009 on the Palestinian population of Gaza is the subject of a powerful documentary by Norwegian director Vibeke Løkkeberg. The searing footage of a bombardment that lasted 22 days shook audiences at the festival. It is not easy to watch. Why should it be?
Løkkeberg and producer-husband Terje Kristiansen explained to us in a conversation that Tears of Gaza was assembled primarily out of frontline footage taken by numerous Palestinians.
During the siege, the international media were prevented from entering the Gaza Strip. Løkkeberg and Kristiansen organized the film, including the gathering of video material, from outside the war zone, in Israel and Egypt. The viewer watches as bombs drop on buildings and people run screaming from the smoking wreckage, at times carrying out wounded, dismembered or dead children.
More than 1,400 people, the majority of them civilians, were killed in the Israeli assault, of whom 400 were women and children. Thousands more were wounded. This compares to the death of 13 Israelis, including soldiers who died as the result of “friendly” fire. Some 20,000 houses, factories and other structures in Gaza were destroyed.
Tears of Gaza’s images uncover the gruesome reality behind these figures. The US government and media, and the Western powers generally, sat by and either encouraged the savagery, or did nothing to stop it. All of the individuals and institutions involved are complicit in war crimes.
Gaza is a small slice of land between the desert and the Mediterranean Sea where a million-and-a-half people are imprisoned. The WSWS commented at the time of the bombing that, “the plight of Gaza resembles nothing so much as the tragic fate of the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland.”
With an infrastructure already badly damaged from years of Israeli embargos and targeting of Gaza’s water and electricity networks, the raw footage captures fires being fought without sufficient water or equipment, and an aftermath of body-filled rubble. One cameraman points to three small children who were clearly executed.
A father shows the scarred flesh, from face to foot, of his young daughter. He wonders about her future and his ability to protect her. “Even if they give us the world, we will not forget,” says one young boy.
A lack of ambulances results in many of the wounded being carried in the arms of bystanders to hospitals, which function with the most rudimentary resources. The harried but experienced staff deal as best they can with the victims—many of them children—of phosphorous bombs and Dense Inert Metal Explosives (Dime), a device that explodes from the ground upwards leaving massive injuries to the lower part of the abdomen and body. Then there are the bodies too charred to identify and the grieving families too traumatized to talk.
Intercut in the footage are the stories of three young people—Yahya, Rasmia and Amira—who provide a shape and structure to a film that does not offer much in the way of political and historical context. The filmmakers interview the three, individually, in the period after the ceasefire. They have lost family members, and are without places to live, food, water and electricity. Rasmia tells the camera that she is always thirsty. The children describe how their schools were destroyed, even those run by the United Nations, and their books burned.
At the film’s Question and Answer session in Toronto, director Løkkeberg said she was motivated to make the courageous Tears of Gaza when she first saw the faces of children who had lived through the war on a television program.
 

nathanhmoore:

Tears of Gaza director: “How could one not want to show the world what is happening?”

By Joanne Laurier
28 September 2010

Originally reported on the World Socialist Web Site

The Israeli military’s murderous assault in December 2008-January 2009 on the Palestinian population of Gaza is the subject of a powerful documentary by Norwegian director Vibeke Løkkeberg. The searing footage of a bombardment that lasted 22 days shook audiences at the festival. It is not easy to watch. Why should it be?

Løkkeberg and producer-husband Terje Kristiansen explained to us in a conversation that Tears of Gaza was assembled primarily out of frontline footage taken by numerous Palestinians.

During the siege, the international media were prevented from entering the Gaza Strip. Løkkeberg and Kristiansen organized the film, including the gathering of video material, from outside the war zone, in Israel and Egypt. The viewer watches as bombs drop on buildings and people run screaming from the smoking wreckage, at times carrying out wounded, dismembered or dead children.

More than 1,400 people, the majority of them civilians, were killed in the Israeli assault, of whom 400 were women and children. Thousands more were wounded. This compares to the death of 13 Israelis, including soldiers who died as the result of “friendly” fire. Some 20,000 houses, factories and other structures in Gaza were destroyed.

Tears of Gaza’s images uncover the gruesome reality behind these figures. The US government and media, and the Western powers generally, sat by and either encouraged the savagery, or did nothing to stop it. All of the individuals and institutions involved are complicit in war crimes.

Gaza is a small slice of land between the desert and the Mediterranean Sea where a million-and-a-half people are imprisoned. The WSWS commented at the time of the bombing that, “the plight of Gaza resembles nothing so much as the tragic fate of the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland.”

With an infrastructure already badly damaged from years of Israeli embargos and targeting of Gaza’s water and electricity networks, the raw footage captures fires being fought without sufficient water or equipment, and an aftermath of body-filled rubble. One cameraman points to three small children who were clearly executed.

A father shows the scarred flesh, from face to foot, of his young daughter. He wonders about her future and his ability to protect her. “Even if they give us the world, we will not forget,” says one young boy.

A lack of ambulances results in many of the wounded being carried in the arms of bystanders to hospitals, which function with the most rudimentary resources. The harried but experienced staff deal as best they can with the victims—many of them children—of phosphorous bombs and Dense Inert Metal Explosives (Dime), a device that explodes from the ground upwards leaving massive injuries to the lower part of the abdomen and body. Then there are the bodies too charred to identify and the grieving families too traumatized to talk.

Intercut in the footage are the stories of three young people—Yahya, Rasmia and Amira—who provide a shape and structure to a film that does not offer much in the way of political and historical context. The filmmakers interview the three, individually, in the period after the ceasefire. They have lost family members, and are without places to live, food, water and electricity. Rasmia tells the camera that she is always thirsty. The children describe how their schools were destroyed, even those run by the United Nations, and their books burned.

At the film’s Question and Answer session in Toronto, director Løkkeberg said she was motivated to make the courageous Tears of Gaza when she first saw the faces of children who had lived through the war on a television program.

 

paxamericana:

machistado:

thomcurse:

When orthodox Jews joined with Palestinian youths throwing stones at Israeli police

This is pretty surreal. Is there a source for this? I’d love some more context. 

A member of Neturei Karta, a fringe of the ultra-Orthodox movement within the anti-Zionist bloc in Israel, talks with a masked Palestinian youth as he shows his support during clashes with Israeli police in the mostly Arab neighborhood of Silwan in Jerusalem. Palestinian protesters clashed with Israeli police as dozens of ultra-nationalist Jews carried Israeli flags through Silwan to assert Jewish sovereignty over all of Jerusalem, according to the organizers of the march.

Hmm. When I was in Jerusalem in July 2009 there was a pretty big gun fight in Silwan. Random. Sorry.  
Reblogged from jesteractivist  962 notes

The Israelis try to dehumanize the Palestinians, just like the Nazis (did) to me. Nobody should dehumanize any others, and those who (do it) are not human.

It may be that Israel is not the most cruel country in the world….but one thing I know for sure is that (it’s) the world champion in pretending to be civilized and cultured. By Holocaust survivor Hajo Meyer (via auzubillah)

Reblogged from mohandasgandhi  202 notes

verbalresistance:

Protester killed as Palestinians mark Land Day

Demonstrator killed by Israeli security forces in Gaza and more than 120 people wounded in riots in the West Bank.

Israeli troops have shot dead a Palestinian man in northern Gaza after a day of protest which saw thousands of people rallying to mark Land Day, a medical spokesman said.

Israeli security forces also fired rubber coated bullets, tear gas and stun grenades to break up groups of Palestinian demonstrators in the occupied West Bank on Friday.

At least 121 people were injured in clashes at the Qalandiya checkpoint on the outskirts of Jerusalem, mostly from tear gas inhalation, medical sources told Al Jazeera.

Palestinian activists had called for a “Global March to Jerusalem” to mark the day when Palestinian Israelis protest against government policies that they say has stripped them of land.

Five medical workers were also reported to have been shot with rubber coated bullets and one car was set ablaze.

Al Jazeera’s Cal Perry reported that Israeli security forces tried to push hundreds of protesters back toward the nearby West Bank town of Ramallah, using water cannon and tear gas.

Rocks were thrown, tyres set alight and Red Crescent ambulances could be seen at the scene.

“This is a place where we frequently see clashes, and what we’re seeing here is the Israeli army needing to put a barrier up and not let people through,” our correspondent said.

“These clashes seem to be a bit more fierce today, and have started earlier in the day than usual.”

Al-Aqsa Access limited

Medics in the Gaza Strip said Israeli security forces also used live fire to prevent protesters from nearing the frontier wall.

Mahmud Zakut, 20, was killed in Beit Hanun in an area near the border fence with Israel, emergency services spokesman Adham Abu Selmiya said in a statement sent to AFP news agency.

Israeli forces were put on high alert at frontier crossings with Lebanon and Syria, but there were no reports of anyone nearing the border fences, unlike last year when several demonstrators were killed in separate protests.

However, violence flared at checkpoints in the West Bank to the north and south of Jerusalem.

Witnesses also reported disturbances at gates leading into the Old City, with police limiting access to the Muslims’ revered al-Aqsa Mosque.

A Reuters news agency reporter saw two men being carried away injured after scuffles at Jerusalem’s Lions’ Gate, while police said they had made five arrests at the Damascus Gate.

Jerusalem is a focal point of conflict, as Palestinians want the city’s eastern sector, captured by Israel in a 1967 war, as capital of a future state.

Israel has annexed East Jerusalem as part of its capital and insists the city remain united.

Six UN Security Council resolutions have denounced or declared invalid Israel’s control of the city

Read More: Al Jazeera

My partner just got me this keffiyeh from the Palestine Fair Trade Alliance for my birthday!  It was made in the last remaining Palestinian keffiyeh factory. Originally in black and white, this pattern of keffiyeh was worn by Palestinian farmers before they became a symbol of Palestinian nationalism during the 1930s. Red keffiyehs were originally worn by Marxist Palestinians, who have virtually disappeared today; red keffiyehs are now sometimes associated with Hamas. However, color symbolism is by no means universally accepted and the keffiyeh is worn by individuals of various political sympathies.  Wearing this Keffiyeh is not a simple fashion statement; it means that I stand in solidarity with the Palestinian people.  

Interested in knowing more:

http://palestinefairtrade.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&product_id=25&flypage=flypage.tpl&pop=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=59&vmcchk=1