"A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything." - Friedrick Nietzsche

Atheist, scientist, secular Buddhist, rat lover, etc.

Originally from Iowa,I am a biology graduate student at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Not everyone of working age contributes equally to supporting the dependent population. Better-educated people are more productive and healthier, retire later and live longer. Education levels in most places have been rising and are likely to continue to do so. Using projections by age, sex and level of education for 195 countries, the demographers conclude that the highest welfare would follow from long-term fertility rates of 1.5-1.8. That excludes the effects of migration: for countries with many immigrants, the figure would be lower.

Educating more people to a higher level will be expensive, both because of the direct costs and because the better-educated start work later. But they will contribute more to the economy throughout their working lives and retire later, so the investment will pay off. Moreover, fewer people will help limit future climate change.

All this suggests that worries about falling populations are better addressed by education than by baby bonuses or tax breaks. But population policies are not all about rational economics: the world pays more attention to populous countries with sizeable armies than small ones without them. And countries that feel under threat tend to look for safety in numbers. It is no accident that, almost alone among developed countries, Israel has a fertility rate well above replacement level, at 2.9.

By

- The Economist, “Why shrinking populations may be no bad thing”

http://www.economist.com/news/international/21603024-why-shrinking-populations-may-be-no-bad-thing-quality-time

Text reads: “Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this web site may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the web site may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted.”
I guess it is a good thing that I’m not totally dependent on NCBI functioning properly to get my research done.  Oh, wait …   The effects of this government shutdown are wide-reaching and effect more than just the senate or the house.  I love how my research (which is conducted and funded outside of the US) may be effected because the load of spoiled children who operate the US government have to act like a bunch of warring factions on a playground.  Any government that operates with the “if I can’t have what I want, no one can” mentality is doomed to failure, at least in the eyes of the people under its rule.

Text reads: “Due to the lapse in government funding, the information on this web site may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the web site may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted.”

I guess it is a good thing that I’m not totally dependent on NCBI functioning properly to get my research done.  Oh, wait …   The effects of this government shutdown are wide-reaching and effect more than just the senate or the house.  I love how my research (which is conducted and funded outside of the US) may be effected because the load of spoiled children who operate the US government have to act like a bunch of warring factions on a playground.  Any government that operates with the “if I can’t have what I want, no one can” mentality is doomed to failure, at least in the eyes of the people under its rule.

I think there should be some sort of clause or written rule that if you order drone or missile strikes on a population of (mostly) civilians (or, you know, just generally being a war-mongering merchant of death), you should have your Nobel Peace Prize taken away.  Or maybe I am mistaken in my belief that this particular honor was to be bestowed upon individuals who have done something to actually further the cause of peace.