"A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything." - Friedrick Nietzsche

Atheist, scientist, secular Buddhist, rat lover, etc.

Originally from Iowa,I am a biology graduate student at Memorial University of Newfoundland.
Reblogged from sciencechicks  70 notes
sciencechicks:

Nettie Maria Stevens (1861 - 1912) was an early American geneticist. She and Edmund Beecher Wilson were the first researchers to describe the chromosomal basis of sex.
An outstanding student, Nettie Stevens completed in two years the four-year course at Westfield Normal School (now Westfield State University) in Massachusetts. She graduated at the top of her class. At Stanford, she received her B.A. in 1899 and her M.A. in 1900, having returned to college after an initial career as a school teacher. Stevens continued her studies in cytology at Bryn Mawr, where she was influenced by the work of the previous head of the Biology Department, Edmund Beecher Wilson, and by that of his successor, T. H. Morgan.
Stevens was one of the first American women to be recognized for her contribution to science. At Bryn Mawr College, she discovered that in some species chromosomes are different among the sexes, by observations of insect chromosomes. The discovery was the first time that observable differences of chromosomes could be linked to an observable difference in physical attributes (such as if an individual is a male or a female. This work was done in 1905. The experiments done to determine this used a range of insects, she identified the Y chromosome in the mealworm Tenebrio. She deduced the chromosomal basis of sex depended on the presence or absence of the Y chromosome. Also Nettie Stevens was the first to recognize that females have two large sex chromosomes. She did not start her research until her thirties and completed her PhD in 1903. She successfully expanded the fields of embryology and cytogenetics. She died on May 4, 1912 of breast cancer, before she was able to fully take up a new faculty position.

sciencechicks:

Nettie Maria Stevens (1861 - 1912) was an early American geneticist. She and Edmund Beecher Wilson were the first researchers to describe the chromosomal basis of sex.

An outstanding student, Nettie Stevens completed in two years the four-year course at Westfield Normal School (now Westfield State University) in Massachusetts. She graduated at the top of her class. At Stanford, she received her B.A. in 1899 and her M.A. in 1900, having returned to college after an initial career as a school teacher. Stevens continued her studies in cytology at Bryn Mawr, where she was influenced by the work of the previous head of the Biology Department, Edmund Beecher Wilson, and by that of his successor, T. H. Morgan.

Stevens was one of the first American women to be recognized for her contribution to science. At Bryn Mawr College, she discovered that in some species chromosomes are different among the sexes, by observations of insect chromosomes. The discovery was the first time that observable differences of chromosomes could be linked to an observable difference in physical attributes (such as if an individual is a male or a female. This work was done in 1905. The experiments done to determine this used a range of insects, she identified the Y chromosome in the mealworm Tenebrio. She deduced the chromosomal basis of sex depended on the presence or absence of the Y chromosome. Also Nettie Stevens was the first to recognize that females have two large sex chromosomes. She did not start her research until her thirties and completed her PhD in 1903. She successfully expanded the fields of embryology and cytogenetics. She died on May 4, 1912 of breast cancer, before she was able to fully take up a new faculty position.

An idea. Input appreciated.

So, I was thinking about starting a little side tumblr dedicated to women in the sciences.  Basically people could just submit photos of themselves doing science or what not and give a little blurb about their research or studies or future studies.  I thought something like this would have already existed, but when I looked I came up with nil.  Good idea, bad idea? Suggestions?